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  • Writer's pictureMark Buskuhl

Do You Pay Taxes When You Sell a House?

Updated: May 18, 2023

Selling a house can be a daunting task for many homeowners, especially when it comes to understanding the tax implications of such a transaction.


One of the most common questions that homeowners ask is whether they have to pay taxes when they sell a house.


The answer to this question is not straightforward, as it depends on several factors, including the selling price of the house, the length of time the homeowner owned the property, and whether the homeowner used the property as their primary residence.


In this blog post, we will explore the tax implications of selling a house and help homeowners understand what they need to know before putting their property on the market.


Do You Pay Taxes When You Sell a House?


What is Capital Gains Tax?


Capital Gains Tax (CGT) is a tax that is levied on the profits made from the sale of an asset. In the case of selling a house, CGT is charged on the difference between the sale price of the property and the price that the homeowner paid when they originally purchased it.


For example, let's say that you purchased a house for $300,000 ten years ago and you're now selling it for $500,000. The capital gain on this property would be $200,000. If the CGT rate is 15%, you would be required to pay $30,000 in taxes.


However, it's important to note that not all homeowners are required to pay CGT when they sell their house. The rules around CGT depend on several factors, including how long the homeowner has owned the property, whether they used the property as their primary residence, and whether they have any other properties.


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The Main Residence Exemption


If the property that you're selling was your main residence for the entire time that you owned it, you may be eligible for the main residence exemption. This exemption means that you do not have to pay CGT on any capital gains made from the sale of the property.


To be eligible for the main residence exemption, you must meet certain criteria. You must have lived in the property as your main residence for the entire time that you owned it, and you must not have used any part of the property for income-producing purposes (such as renting out a room).


It's important to note that the main residence exemption only applies to one property at a time. If you own multiple properties and have lived in each of them as your main residence, you will need to choose which property you want to apply the exemption to.



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The 6-Year Rule


If you have lived in the property as your main residence for part of the time that you owned it, you may still be eligible for a partial exemption from CGT. The 6-year rule allows homeowners to claim a portion of the main residence exemption if they have not lived in the property as their main residence for the entire time that they owned it.


Under the 6-year rule, homeowners can continue to treat the property as their main residence for up to six years after they move out. This means that if you lived in the property for three years before moving out and renting it out for three years, you can still claim the main residence exemption for the three years that you lived in the property.


However, it's important to note that if you claim the 6-year rule, you cannot claim any other property as your main residence during that time.


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Other Considerations


If you have owned the property for less than 12 months, you may be subject to a higher rate of CGT. Short-term capital gains (gains made on assets owned for less than 12 months) are taxed at the same rate as your income tax.


Additionally, if you have used any part of the property for income-producing purposes (such as renting out a room), you may not be eligible for the main residence exemption. In this case, you will have to pay CGT on the portion of the property that was used for income-producing purposes.


It's also worth noting that if you sell a property that was not your main residence, you will be required to pay CGT on any capital gains made from the sale. The rate of CGT will depend on how long you owned the property and your income tax rate.


Finally, it's important to keep accurate records of all expenses related to the purchase and sale of the property. This includes things like legal fees, real estate agent commissions, and any renovations or repairs made to the property. These expenses can be used to reduce the amount of CGT that you are required to pay.


Conclusion


Selling a house can be a complicated process, and understanding the tax implications of the sale is an important part of that process. While not all homeowners are required to pay taxes when they sell a house, it's important to be aware of the rules and regulations surrounding capital gains tax and the main residence exemption.


If you're planning to sell a property, it's a good idea to seek professional advice from a tax accountant or financial advisor. They can help you understand your tax obligations and ensure that you're taking advantage of any exemptions or deductions that you may be eligible for.


By understanding the tax implications of selling a house, you can make informed decisions and ensure that you're not caught off guard by unexpected tax bills. With careful planning and the right advice, selling a house can be a profitable and stress-free experience.

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